All posts filed under: Trends

Human Ivory by Lucie Majerus

«”Human Ivory” proposes an egalitarian jewellery collection, where the body is being adorned by its own gem, polished from recognizable teeth into an abstract but familiar pearl shape.» While researching abundant and scarce materials, I was intrigued by the amount of meat industry waste and the lack of ivory. Not only elephants have teeth, but what happens to cow and pig teeth? Why don’t we value other teeth as well? When I lost my own wisdom teeth, I kept them and came up with the idea of Human Ivory. Why wouldn’t we value our own material instead of seeking precious material from other species? How can I as a designer give value to human teeth outside of their initial context the mouth? All my process was written down in my Bachelor Thesis “Human Ivory”. With this project, I want to twist our perspective on valuable materials and reconsider conventional preciousness. The concept is to suggest a new cultural behavior where we humans seek for preciousness within our own material. A tooth can only be harvested …

Wooden shoes by Lex Pott

«Studio Thomas Vailly took a natural element, the Pinus Pinaster tree, ripped it apart – rearranging its elements into man-made materials.» “Reconfiguration of a tree” is a research project focused on Pinus Pinaster, a resinous tree harvested for its pitch. Studio Thomas Vailly took a natural element, the Pinus Pinaster tree, ripped it apart – rearranging its elements into man-made materials. To reveal the full potential of the material, black resin and pine wood have been delivered to David Derksen, Gardar Eyjolfsson and Lex Pott each reconfigured a part of the tree into products. The wooden shoes are made out of traditional Dutch clogs. The traditional shoes have been transformed into contemporary shaped wooden shoes. The exhibition called In No Particular Order will show the new pieces that are still being developed. This project is commissioned by Studio Thomas Vailly for the Dutch Design Week. The wooden shoes are made out of traditional Dutch Clogs. The traditional shoes have been transformed into contemporary shaped wooden shoes. Wooden shoes by Lex Pott Trends: Experienced Narratives.

Vanitas by Birgit Severin

«I strongly believe that beauty, neither in humans nor in objects, is based on perfection. It’s rather change, imperfection and even decay through which beauty unfolds.» I started to work with rubber and surface textures during the last year of my Master at the Design Academy Eindhoven – the year in which I also turned 30. Having studied psychology first and worked for a while before returning to university, I was naturally older than most of my fellow students. The question, what it means to get older as a woman, was therefore of course on my mind. We live in an aging society striving for youth. Advertisements, article, and pieces of advice on how to stay young, fit, healthy and slim are surrounding us every day. In Berlin, the city I live in, you find more easily an organic superfood store than a local bakery. Yet, paradoxically, while “age” has long been synonymous with wisdom and prudence—indeed considered in itself sufficient to have earned society’s respect—these physical realities of aging have, particularly in a female …

Cotton Bowls by Krupka Stieghan

«The elegantly shaped objects are extremely lightweight and very stable, due to the crossed layers of cotton yarn. Using an acrylic based finishing the bowls are limited resistant to humidity.» Each object is one of a kind and handmade in Berlin. This way three-dimensional objects are created which not only reuse and upcycle waste materials (from industrial cotton waste) but also inspire with their material aesthetics, moving between textile, paper, and wood. The elegantly shaped objects are extremely lightweight and very stable, due to the crossed layers of cotton yarn. Using an acrylic based finishing the bowls are limited resistant to humidity. Industrial cotton yarn remnants were used in a hand-laminating process in combination with a textile hardener to make the cotton bowls. Krupka-Stieghan / Images © Krupka-Stieghan Studio Trends: Sustainable and Shared.

Círculo Ceramics

«I believe that the pieces must reflect the love that I have on making them, although it makes my production really slow. But I am still working on it, okay?» Initially, ceramics appeared as an escape for me. A time in which I could be relaxed thinking about what I was really creating, instead of thinking about why I was creating. After becoming an escape, ceramics became a way of life, something that I knew I would like to do for a long time. I created Círculo Ceramics in order to create a brand that would answer my needs as a craft consumer, but also as an artisan, a brand that would reflect my vision of the world in a very subtle and clean way, but I do think that it is something that can be built with time and experience. This isn’t a collection. This photo was taken by Rodrigo Cardoso, for Monocle Magazine, about a collaboration that I made with Casa Mãe (a resort in Lagos) and it a gathering of the pieces …

Lover Seat by Gonçalo Campos

«How can a “chaise longue” become a modular object? This allows it to be shipped more easily, it becomes easier to stock and can be assembled in more configurations.» This object was designed as a response to a simple question. How can a “chaise longue” become a modular object? This allows it to be shipped more easily, it becomes easier to stock and can be assembled in more configurations. The best solution was to make the back and armrest into a module that also works as support for the seat. The result was these corners in wood as they allow the product to be assembled in different ways for different purposes. The most obvious mark of this item is the wooden structure that is apparent, instead of hidden inside the upholstery. This structure allows the creation of a wide area for the armrest that can work as a small table. These details are definitely unique. They were developed as a support to all sort of items we carry with us daily. These wide armrests are …

Regen Rainproof Collection by Wendy Andreu

«it is very different from the traditional way of making clothes. Instead of cutting and sewing patterns, Regen is built already in 3 dimensions. There is no loss of material.» The rainproof collection Regen (meaning ‘rain’ in Dutch) has started from a material research. In 2014, I was experimenting with soft matters and found out that the cotton rope and the latex could stick together and therefore create a new fabric which was neither woven nor knitted. Then, I analyzed this sample and thought that the latex could give a waterproof layer to this fabric. I naturally designed accessories and garments for the rain. But I imagine that one day, I could also design vases, furniture or objects for different purposes with this technique. Since I studied metal craftsmanship and product design, I have a different way of working than a fashion designer. For the Regen project, after inventing the material itself, I designed the production system which consists of metal molds around which the rope is coiled. The liquid latex is applied afterward. Once …

Jewellery by Arc Objects

«The pieces are unique in their boldness, in their simplicity, in their abstraction. They push the boundaries of wearable and usable sculpture.» ARC is a concept, not a product: it is, at its core, a body of work that seeks to encourage mindfulness and individual creative expression. From jewelry to home objects, it is a collection that explores and experiments with wearable and functional sculpture. An arc is simultaneously a shape and a concept; similarly, ARC objects seek to be both literal and figurative. It is the continuation of my thesis project at Parsons. The pieces are unique in their boldness, in their simplicity, in their abstraction. They push the boundaries of wearable and usable sculpture. ARC is not inspired by trends; in fact, the designs are born from quite the opposite starting point. ARC is inspired by timeless beauty; colors, shapes, textures found in nature; the surreal; the abstract; and asymmetry that feels as balanced as symmetry. Interview with Arc Objects / Images © Heather Sten / model: River Jensen. Trends: Hiperbolic Minimalism.

Bubblegraphy by Oddness Studio

«The pattern on each product is created by a special process of blowing air bubbles in the glaze. The coating creates a three-dimensional motive and makes each vase unique.» BUBBLEGRAPHY is a series of vases with a mesmerizing look. I designed it together with Thomas van der Sman, also a graduate of Design Academy. We were experimenting and looking to make a new skin that has the same aesthetical qualities of marble. In depth of color and in layers. The soap glaze we developed was an outcome of this material study that we took to a next level by applying it as vases. We are both fascinated by ‘designed randomness’; there is a thin line where you can shape the odd, and use the qualities of the mess so it doesn’t look messy but still the overload of information in a direction. The pattern on each product is created by a special process of blowing air bubbles in the glaze. The coating creates a three-dimensional motive and makes each vase unique. I think there is definitely …

Akra collection by Samuray Martins

«For the debut of Akra Collection, my inspiration came from the natural beauties of northeastern Brazil, especially the Lençóis Maranhenses National Park, home to the country’s largest coastal dune field and where the collection was conceived.» I’m constantly traveling around Brazil. My main source of inspiration is nature and Brazil has a recognized and peculiar natural wealth. For the debut of Akra Collection – a label, which was the result of the Akra Project – my inspiration came from the natural beauties of northeastern Brazil, especially the Lençóis Maranhenses National Park, home to the country’s largest coastal dune field and where the collection was conceived. It was there where I found the endemic species of the buriti palm, the main raw material of our debut collection, called Maranhão. The collection is a tribute to the local artisans with whom I work in collaboration. The Akra Project was born to encourage the cultural heritage of Brazilian handicrafts and combine contemporary design with traditional artisanship. Consumers are no longer satisfied with the vague social promises of brands; innovation …