All posts filed under: Experienced Narratives

“If we combine the experience economy with the identities narrated under the banner of an experience and symbolic culture that overthrows material culture, then we identify a new mentality that aggregates concepts such as storytelling, nostalgia, experienced, discourse, roots and identities…” trendsobserver.com

Ceramic and Pre-Hispanic Clay by Uxiii

«The world moves so fast now with technology and capitalism that we might find ourselves with a shared feeling of wanting to slow down and sometimes creating something that not always “works”.» As creatives, sometimes we tend to seek perfection in everything we do. My ceramic work has become that place where I can escape from perfection, where I can let myself go. Everything started as a personal need to create.  “El barro de Ticul” is a clay that comes from a community outside Merida, Yucatán, México where I’m based. The clay is like a Terracotta kind of clay, but with a very particular color and texture, I would say it is unique. It was like love at first sight. The only thing is that it was far away from perfect, It was rough, dirty, and filled with impurities. So I made my first vessel, crooked, and kind of funny looking, to me it seemed like it could walk. The process begins by searching locations around the Península to extract the materials. The help of the …

Palorosa Bags

«Palorosa has a social impact determined by the desire to keep alive local craft techniques, enhancing them through a contemporary vision.»   Palorosa’s vision is to create a sophisticated and minimalist, recognizable aesthetic. An aesthetic born from the union of two cultures, Italian and Guatemalan, architectural and industrial, artisanal and rural. Starting from the origins of a product, a market basket, we wanted to abstract it from its context, without losing its nature and functionality. The basic line of products accompanies you into your journeys and discoveries: you can go everywhere with a basket. The brand uses with care and attention colors and shades, with local materials, mostly the plastic threads, from primarily recycled plastic. Color becomes material which is kindly interwoven into the Palorosa objects and accessories. Since the beginning of the project, the aim has been to study a technique strongly linked to its history, to learn the details and improve them, through a gradual approach on the creation. Palorosa started at my home with an artisan, and since then, we built a …

Flats Exclusivas

«In every process is respected its time and cost, so on average, it takes 30 days for each production to be ready.»   ‘Flats Exclusivas’ is a minimalist brand of basic, timeless shoes, handcrafted in small quantities. The production counts on the expertise of the best professionals of the area in São Paulo working with premium raw materials. In every process is respected its time and cost, so on average, it takes 30 days for each production to be ready. The brand relies on the concept of Art Shoes: artists who create interventions in each model of flats. They are limited series, numbered and signed. As Mariana Cassandra, the creator of the brand, explains, “Exclusive Flats were made to last, to inspire and to cross fads. Like a work of art.” All models are created by Mariana, who conducts and monitors the whole production process, entirely handmade, as well as all the research of raw materials and products, using only top quality materials, as well as the artists and collaborators. They are people with incredible …

Handmade Nature by Daniella Saraya

«Alongside the emotional work, the project also had a research motivation – the observation of nature in order to understand the different processes it undergoes in time (…)»   This project is actually a development of my final project, at my B.A. in jewelry design –RE-COVER- in which I dealt with the formation of a person’s character, in comparison with the processes of crystallization in nature. And what is the meaning of the whole in this context, and how is it defined. Over time, a person goes through contradictory processes wherein they accumulate layers and peel them off. A varying exposure of the surface creates patterns of behavior and habits; injury or removal create a space and reveal the earlier layers.  The same experiences constantly change the existing whole and redefine its form.  I believe that the way to heal requires a certain acceptance of the absence and defining it as part of the whole. Alongside the emotional work, the project also had a research motivation – the observation of nature in order to understand …

MABO by Marcella Leite

«My goal is always to create jewels that go beyond economic value, carry a content of art, design, and architecture and deliver this representation.»   With a Carioca inspiration, Marcella Leite, who studied architecture, fashion and graduated in design, launched a Modernist collection, the third of its three-year history and the expression of its brand’s maturation. “It’s a very special line. It took me a long time to develop: it’s been six months since I got out of my comfort zone and I made myself do something different.”  The inspiration is the modernist movement, “the impact of it on architecture and various icons of modern art”. Among the muses and muses of Marcella, are the artist Alexander Calder, the architect Oscar Niemeyer, and the painters Pablo Picasso and Tarsila do Amaral. Thus, each piece combines the minimalism and lightness that are trademarks of Mabo to the content and information of art.” “My goal is always to create jewels that go beyond economic value, carry a content of art, design and architecture and deliver this representation. …

Control Points Tile by Federico Pazienza

«I do believe there are trends in design. They are made first by designers focused on pure research, and then solidified by bigger commercial design labels.»   To me, the goal of designers should be to interpret the ever-changing objects’ environment. It is not a static field, it is close to what happens after a scientific discovery: it answers a question and makes space for hundreds of others. In my case design is an intuitive process, I guess it is for me as the music is for a violinist. The “control point” series is a good example of modern/antique. If you look at the plate or tile you realize they look modern but with a subtle link to centuries ago. This is what happens when you blend human history with nowadays’ aesthetics and technology. I do believe there are trends in design. They are made first by designers focused on pure research and then solidified by bigger commercial design labels. Interview with Federico Pazienza. Trends: Experienced Narratives, Empower Me.

Ceramics by Enriqueta Cepeda

«I do not strive to achieve perfection, but instead, to achieve harmony in the irregular. I like to get a relatively heavy vessel to be experienced as graceful and easy.»   I work with my hands and with very simple tools because I want to have contact with the clay. Feel the clay with my fingertips. This was the way ceramics have been made for thousands of years. My design language is based on classical, timeless sculptural forms. I have been inspired by different ancient cultures and found my own expressions. Pueblo Indians who burnish their pots and polish after firing. The Japanese aesthetics with the concept of Wabi Sabi; to take care of the opportunities and strive for asymmetry and simplicity. I’m inspired by the non-symmetrical forms of nature. I build my ceramics by hand, letting the shapes to grow slowly. Throwing or casting do not interest me, they are working methods more to produce similar products and to produce larger quantities. I work with the natural color of the clay and its own …

Canoa Lab – Part II

«We are also aware that the world is unstoppable, and patterns of action need to be renewed, even in crafts, whose model is in a moment of division and continual change.» It could be said that our pieces and our space, CANOA-lab (a place where everyone can approach the subject through classes, open study or internships), follow current tendencies in this promising future for handcrafts. Not so much related to shape, texture or their finish but to a vital positioning towards production, market, and knowledge sharing. Producing stuff by hand, doing some research, experimenting with plastic arts and enjoying work and creation processes make us have the potential to grow and develop ourselves while confronting the huge number of problems which arise with the decision to become producers and distributors of what we do. In this volatile society which has long forgotten the idea of working at the same place all your life, in this moment of history when values are changing and society demands a more sensitive and sustainable production, it seems necessary to …

Canoa Lab – Part I

«We think the dizzying speed of the current world keeps us from seeing how really important things are. So TIME was a key element for us, as it is probably the most valuable thing we have.» CANOA started as an idea around October 2015 but it wasn’t until May 2016 when it became a label at an official presentation in an open studio taking place two yearly in Russafa (Valencia). To set the project up we brought to the table our main curiosity and worries. We think the dizzying speed of the current world keeps us from seeing how really important things are. So TIME was a key element for us, as it is probably the most valuable thing we have. And we need it to follow our INQUISITIVENESS, the second inexhaustible and infinite key element of our project. We had just learned two new trades (new for us, old for humanity), and we found out that most crafts require slow and precise ability in order to be developed. From that moment we needed a …

Object & Totem by Julianne Ahn

«Ceramics as a craft has always been a trend.  It’s just taking a new and interesting wave in this modern digital age where making something tactile keeps you present.» I suppose there’s no story behind Object & Totem, just a circumstance I found myself in during a time in my life of feeling incredibly vulnerable just having lost my job.  So, I decided to take a ceramics class, because it was the winter and I had time. It was very frustrating in the beginning and almost gave up at the wheel, yet it was incredibly addictive, the swing of emotions you get from what starts as a messy ball to the satisfaction of creating a functional bowl.  And I guess that’s how I came to the conclusion of naming it Object & Totem.  All the good stuff happens in between the things you see and recognize as objects before they become something you cast off. It’s hard to define a significance behind what the work represents when the process of making ceramics feels significant in …