All posts filed under: Experienced Narratives

“If we combine the experience economy with the identities narrated under the banner of an experience and symbolic culture that overthrows material culture, then we identify a new mentality that aggregates concepts such as storytelling, nostalgia, experienced, discourse, roots and identities…” trendsobserver.com

Mirrors by BEN & AJABLANC

«The collection’s peculiarity is based on the compositional cohesiveness of the pieces, that allow the juxtaposition to work.» With our collection of mirrors partnered with silk fiber, we were exploring the mirror as both functional and sculptural object through the use of juxtaposition, shape, and form. In this case, it is the hard, cool properties of mirror paired with the light, warm, airy qualities of the hand-spun, hand-painted silk.  At the heart of the studio is the use of natural elements and rich materials creating work that celebrates design frisson – an elegant balance of beauty and functionality. This Mirrors’ collection is based on the compositional cohesiveness of the pieces, that allow the juxtaposition to work – it’s not enough to pair dissimilar materials; the work overall must reflect a wholeness and completeness within the disparate parts. That is the challenge and, we think, the success of these pieces. The EOS Mirror is named after the ancient Greek goddess of Dawn, exploring the relationship between the functional and nonfunctional elements of objects, including the utility of a mirror …

Classics of Danish Design: Iconic Chairs by Arne Jacobsen

Who was Arne Jacobsen? Arne Jacobsen received his education at the School of Architecture of the Copenhagen Academy of Arts, where he later became a professor of architecture. Arne Jacobsen’s early works were inspired by Le Corbusier and Ludwig Mies van der Rohe, but soon Arne Jacobsen developed his own style, in which his love for botany, his knowledge of proportions and his love of nature are recognizable. In 1930, Arne Jacobsen founds his own architectural office and joins forces with the architect Flemming Lassen. Four years later, Arne Jacobsen starts working with the Danish furniture manufacturer Fritz Hansen. Arne Jacobsen intended to manufacture furniture industrially in a quality that was previously only possible through the craft. At the end of the 1950s, Jacobsen achieved a high point as an architect designing the SAS Royal Hotel in Copenhagen, now called the Blu Royal Hotel. Arne Jacobsen determined the design of the building down to the smallest details, based on his style principles: professional, rational and modern. Not everyone valued the formal language of Jacobsen, his …

À Capucha by Raquel Pais

«The novelties we introduce are intended to make a sustainable, functional and beautiful item that proudly takes its place in contemporary life.» À Capucha! was born from the passion for a place where life lingers, where things are still handmade. A place that comprises centuries of tradition, where knowledge is shared by grandparents and grandchildren. Their hands create objects that are born from the refinement of tradition, so they can be reinvented in a modern and global environment. And so we did, we found in tradition the most perfect design process: the capucha – the age-old refinement of a technique and a form for a specific function. We decided then that we had to tell the world about it!  To create our capuchas we work closely with local artisans in a constant exchange between design and production. We explore the technique of handwork in burel, trying to understand its potential and limits. This artisanal process gives us the freedom to test and iterate in an immediate way, which allows us to create unique pieces, or small runs, which …

Colonia by Yosuke Matsushita

«Original products are difficult to design and produce because of our modern technological developments and society’s demands.» ‘Colonia’  is made from “rosin”, a traditional material used for many fields, and “melamine sponge” that is modern material. In ‘Colonia’ I focused on certain properties: rosin (that melts and becomes solid when it is cooled), and melamine sponge (that has a high absorbability and workability). The results are exquisite textures, colours, a slight scent of pine and soothing tones like glass contained air. Molds are unnecessary, and the process results in a beautiful and natural shape curve made by tied sponge, with details controlled both by people and natural phenomenon. There is no need to prepare any particular environment and special skills to make this product. It means that people of all ages can be creators, having the pleasure and being surprised by the results. You cannot control its quality like in general mass products. In spite of this, each piece of ‘Colonia’ has a character barely seen in current mundane products. I hope it can bring valuable experiences of making things, as a …

A Boi by Ana Maria Gomez

«By reinterpreting the elements of iconography, the traditional ways of making the textiles are reinforced in the present time.» A: I.pron. clí. Prefijo de tercera persona. Third person conjugation Boi: s. Manta (vestido prehispánico). Plaid (pre-Hispanic “dress”) A boi: his plaid I have always been fascinated with the role of iconography in textiles among different cultures. Since the traditional looming machine allows a limited set of structural combinations, it could be assumed that most iconography consists of combinations of three basic shapes: diamond, triangles, and crosses. What’s interesting to me is to recognize how each culture appropriates these symbols in different contexts. Some years ago I started a textile collaboration with William, a traditional handicraft artisan from a small town in the Altiplano cundiboyasense of Colombia: Cucunubá, Cundinamarca. William is proud to be part of the people that perpetuate an ancestral textile tradition over many generations in this land. So important for the region of Cundinamarca that the spindle is one of the symbols in the town’s heraldry: this artifact occupies a place of privilege …

Moya by Anastasiya Koshcheeva

«Birchbark’s versatile qualities such as durability, flexibility, tear strength, breathability, and antibacterial properties make it one of the most fascinating natural materials that never cease to inspire us.» With great care and attention to detail, we manufacture products from natural birchbark that bring contemporary design and a tested handicraft tradition in harmony. We source our birchbark from the endless Siberian taiga and let its natural beauty unravel to the fullest with the help of clear shapes and playful colours. Our products link the uniqueness of a natural material with the precision of modern technology. Since its foundation, it has been MOYA’s pursuit to explore the fascinating qualities of birchbark, and to celebrate them on a daily basis by developing functional product solutions. We are convinced that good design makes life better. MOYA was founded in Berlin by the Russian-German designer Anastasiya Koshcheeva and means “mine” in Russian. Since 2012, Anastasiya has been passionate about connecting the ancient Siberian handicraft from her homeland with clear contemporary design. Since the very beginning, it has been our aim …

Ceramic and Pre-Hispanic Clay by Uxiii

«The world moves so fast now with technology and capitalism that we might find ourselves with a shared feeling of wanting to slow down and sometimes creating something that not always “works”.» As creatives, sometimes we tend to seek perfection in everything we do. My ceramic work has become that place where I can escape from perfection, where I can let myself go. Everything started as a personal need to create.  “El barro de Ticul” is a clay that comes from a community outside Merida, Yucatán, México where I’m based. The clay is like a Terracotta kind of clay, but with a very particular color and texture, I would say it is unique. It was like love at first sight. The only thing is that it was far away from perfect, It was rough, dirty, and filled with impurities. So I made my first vessel, crooked, and kind of funny looking, to me it seemed like it could walk. The process begins by searching locations around the Península to extract the materials. The help of the …

Palorosa Bags

«Palorosa has a social impact determined by the desire to keep alive local craft techniques, enhancing them through a contemporary vision.»   Palorosa’s vision is to create a sophisticated and minimalist, recognizable aesthetic. An aesthetic born from the union of two cultures, Italian and Guatemalan, architectural and industrial, artisanal and rural. Starting from the origins of a product, a market basket, we wanted to abstract it from its context, without losing its nature and functionality. The basic line of products accompanies you into your journeys and discoveries: you can go everywhere with a basket. The brand uses with care and attention colors and shades, with local materials, mostly the plastic threads, from primarily recycled plastic. Color becomes material which is kindly interwoven into the Palorosa objects and accessories. Since the beginning of the project, the aim has been to study a technique strongly linked to its history, to learn the details and improve them, through a gradual approach on the creation. Palorosa started at my home with an artisan, and since then, we built a …

Flats Exclusivas

«In every process is respected its time and cost, so on average, it takes 30 days for each production to be ready.»   ‘Flats Exclusivas’ is a minimalist brand of basic, timeless shoes, handcrafted in small quantities. The production counts on the expertise of the best professionals of the area in São Paulo working with premium raw materials. In every process is respected its time and cost, so on average, it takes 30 days for each production to be ready. The brand relies on the concept of Art Shoes: artists who create interventions in each model of flats. They are limited series, numbered and signed. As Mariana Cassandra, the creator of the brand, explains, “Exclusive Flats were made to last, to inspire and to cross fads. Like a work of art.” All models are created by Mariana, who conducts and monitors the whole production process, entirely handmade, as well as all the research of raw materials and products, using only top quality materials, as well as the artists and collaborators. They are people with incredible …

Handmade Nature by Daniella Saraya

«Alongside the emotional work, the project also had a research motivation – the observation of nature in order to understand the different processes it undergoes in time (…)»   This project is actually a development of my final project, at my B.A. in jewelry design –RE-COVER- in which I dealt with the formation of a person’s character, in comparison with the processes of crystallization in nature. And what is the meaning of the whole in this context, and how is it defined. Over time, a person goes through contradictory processes wherein they accumulate layers and peel them off. A varying exposure of the surface creates patterns of behavior and habits; injury or removal create a space and reveal the earlier layers.  The same experiences constantly change the existing whole and redefine its form.  I believe that the way to heal requires a certain acceptance of the absence and defining it as part of the whole. Alongside the emotional work, the project also had a research motivation – the observation of nature in order to understand …