Lilly’s Chair by We Do Wood

«Today many children’s rooms are filled with chemicals, and independent reports state that an average children’s room contains up to 3x more formaldehyde fumes than any other room in the house!”»

 

We Do Wood designer Sebastian Jørgensen designed Lilly’s Chair for his daughter Lilly Jørgensen approximately 10 years ago. The idea was to create a chair for the 1-6 year old that didn’t talk down to children in terms of design and that was made from clean and sustainable materials. Geo’s Table came soon after to create a drawing table that would match the chair.
The material chosen was bamboo due to the sustainability aspects, the strength of the material and due to the fact that it is a clean material. Today many children’s rooms are filled with chemicals, and independent reports state that an average children’s room contains up to 3x more formaldehyde fumes than any other room in the house! The formaldehyde is very poisonous and can come from toys, clothes, paint and…. furniture. Lilly’s Chair has been tested and the formaldehyde emission is 0, which is something we are proud of.
Well, I think that there are several things that define these pieces:
-Design: The intention was to create a design that could be used in any room and in combination with any other piece of furniture. We wanted to step away from the other ‘childish’ kids designs in the furniture industry and create something that everyone would enjoy to look at and use.
 
-Function: The chair is designed so it doesn’t fall over even when the child sits on the edge of the seat. Furthermore, it is a know-down chair that can be dissembled and stored away until their next generation can use it.
-Material: In 2005-2006 bamboo was a completely new material in the European design world, and to a large extent it still is. When used correct bamboo is an extraordinary material in terms of availability/sustainability (read more here: http://www.wedowood.dk/our-responsibility/), strength, weight, texture, and feel.
We try not to think short term. There is currently a trend about ‘buy and throw away after use’ that we would like to react against, but when looking at the success of some of the major low-cost furniture retailers, I think we are loosing at the moment.
We are trying to match new design ideas with high-quality sustainable materials, which are marketed at affordable prices, but I think that is more a niche than a trend, to be honest.

 

Interview with We Do Wood / Images © We Do Wood.

Trends: EcoSustainability.

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